The falling returns of Sonia Gandhi in Charge

The falling returns of Sonia Gandhi in Charge

The second act of Sonia Gandhi as president of Congress is well exciting. She took over the party from her son, Rahul Gandhi when she was facing an identity crisis like when she first climbed across to the top post (at that moment she led the Congress effectively for 19 years, finishing as its longest-tenured president).

 
Years ago, she met with widespread thankfulness from party leaders for embracing the top job. However, this time around, younger politicians chafing to take over are aggrieved about readily overcoming them, and an ever-increasing line of rebels is bending out of the party. Sonia Gandhi is struggling with little flames everywhere, particularly in countries that are prepared to vote in the coming months, including Haryana, Maharashtra, and Jharkhand and Delhi.
 
Whereas the return of Sonia Gandhi as president three decades earlier may have prevented BS Hooda, Haryana's former chief minister, from quitting Congress and establishing a regional party, it is a stop and not an end to his plans.
 
Unless Hooda is made ahead of state and granted a say in ticket distribution, he would make good on his threat of quitting, replacing the ineffective Ashok Tanwar, who was Rahul Gandhi's appointee and favourite.
 
Hooda has an exceptionally excellent equation with Ahmed Patel, Sonia's principal aid, and Ghulam Nabi Azad, Haryana's state-in-charge, both campaigning for him. But explicit allegations of the kind Hooda made at the latest rally where he assaulted the management of Congress and said the stance of the party on Article 370 was incorrect are fairly rare in the Congress ' big-tent durbar.



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